Category: Customer Service

Discrimination in the Medical Workplace

Patients expecting medical care bring their prejudice and ignorance into the hospital with them. But it's not just doctors who experience this kind of discrimination.

Won’t You Please Help Me? Usability Heuristic #10

The final piece of advice he offers to increase usability of any software system isn't as much about the system itself as what is provided with the system: Help and Documentation.

Congratulations…it’s an error! Usability Heuristic #9

Generally speaking, bad error messages come in two varieties: The Too-Specific and the Too-General.

Too Much of a Good Thing: Usability Heuristic #8

It is important to acknowledge the reality that more information does not necessarily lead to better outcomes or better decisions.

Be Flexible: Usability Heuristic #7

Flexibility allows users to use the system in the way that makes the most sense for them, allowing them to quickly finish their tasks and move on to the next thing on their plate. This makes happy users, and happy users are some of the best advocates you can have.

This Looks Familiar: Usability Heuristic #6

The User Interface should be designed in such a way that there are as many hints as possible for what a user needs to do next.

User, Save Thyself! Usability Heuristic #5

You cannot design anything to prevent every possible error. But designing to eliminate every possible error should not be the goal.

Consistency is Key – Usability Heuristic #4

The idea behind this consistency guideline is that users should never have to guess how an icon, button or procedure will work on various places in the system.

I Didn’t Mean It! Usability Heuristic #3

We are human and we all screw up from time to time. The nice thing about technology is that you often have the option to undo your mistakes.

The Real World: Usability Heuristic #2

Staff will have to adjust to use the system. But there is no need to make it as difficult as possible.